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Tuesday, 25 February 2014

Pazyryk Tatoo Jewelry

One of my most romantic activities would be to curl up on my bed under the blanket with a hot water bottle on a cold, dark and rainy afternoon and read a book by the bed-stand. Of course, when it comes to Kolkata (Calcutta), rainy days don't give you the luxury requirement of a warm blanket. A couple of weeks ago, I gave up on my guitar classes on a rainy and dark Sunday afternoon and chose to stay back and do the same before winter passes by in a jiffy!

That evening, I read up on a very interesting civilization about whom I have been intrigued quite a while ago. I discovered these amazing tatoo images on the net a couple of years ago and found out that they were of historical importance. I chose not to read up much on them at that time and pushed the activity for "my romantic, rainy afternoon" which I got a couple of weeks ago. I adapted these tatoos on my jewelry two years ago on these pendants made of pine-wood. I hand-painted these animal tatoos which are from the ancient Pazyryk culture and read up many interesting stories about them later.
Hand-painted Pazyryk Tatoo Pendant by jaya-online.com

Stuck as I got in the labyrinth of my thoughts while reading , I wandered far away again in the colours and patterns of the Pazyryk Culture. This civilization that developed around 3-6 BC (Iron Age), used to draw beautiful animal tatoos on their bodies. What amazes me is the sophistication and precision with which, people so long ago painted those tatoos. They were discovered on the bodies of mummies that were buried in long barrows in the Ukok Plateau of the Pazyryk Valley of the Altai mountains between Siberia and modern Russia.

Hand-painted Pazyryk Tatoo Pendant by jaya-online.com
 Reminds me of a dialogue from the great film-maker, Satyajit Ray's "Agantuk". Late Utpal Dutta (a veteran Indian Actor) says that art cannot be taught or learned by merely visiting an art school. He had that thought in his mind when he, for the first time, saw a cave painting of a raging bison from the Iron Age in some foreign land and realized that although it is easy to draw a bison, it is mysterious how people from the pre-historic age portrayed those raging and volatile eyes of the bison without having attended a prestigious or popular institution that taught Fine Arts.